“Alexa, ask T1Resources, what is….”

During the Christmas break whilst configuring my new Amazon Echo to use the already existing Nightscout Alexa integration, my Developer’s mind was curious how these Alexa ‘skills’ were created. I’d need an idea though, but what? What could I do? All the skills existed. Ok, let’s forget this idea.

Hours later I was putting some coding changes into the Diabetes/Tech Dictionary of terms on T1Resources.UK.

I realised THIS would be my Alexa project. It would be great if someone could say ‘Alexa, ask T1Resources, what is Looping’, or WeAreNotWaiting, or AMA, or ISF etc..

And now they can.

You can start off saying ‘Alexa, ask T1Resources, what is…’.
You can say ‘Alexa, ask T1Resources, tell me a random word’.
Or even perhaps – just for fun – ‘Alexa, ask T1Resources, when will I be cured’.
Ask about any of the acronyms found used with the DIY looping systems, like ‘AMA’, ‘flash’, ‘putty’ or ‘SMB’.
Ask about standard diabetes terms like ‘ISF’, ‘CR’, or ‘bolus’.
Have some fun asking what is ‘rage bolus’, ‘unicorn’, ‘dana’, ‘chapstick’ or ‘leaky reps’.

You can ask what Nightscout is, or #WeAreNotWaiting or Looping, as I am here:

Adding the T1Resources Skill to your Echo

t1resources alexa>Within you Amazon Alexa phone app:
– click the menu bars in the top left
– choose Skill & Games
– click the search icon
– enter T1Resources
– click T1Resources to view the skill info
– enable the skil
– you’re ready to try this on you Amazon Echo, or with your phone app.

T1Resources.UK’s Dictionary of Diabetes/Tech Terms

Back in October whilst standing in front of 200 health care professionals at the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh, a not-so-immaculately timed* scheduled tweet announced my latest project as I presented about it to the audience*

t1resources dictionary announcement
*I was ahead in my presentation by two minutes. Damn!

Earlier in 2018 Dr Anna Dover tweeted about trying to find out what all the terms used by the WeAreNotWaiting community meant. It seemed like a good project and surely it would only take a day or two, right? Nothing ever goes quite as planned and knowing that I wanted to announce it as my presentation I hurriedly started writing it a couple of weeks before.

It turns out writing the web site for the dictionary was no problem at all, but getting all the definitions live was; I thought there would only be 50 or so and now in January we stand at over 270. It became quite difficult to determine what was just tech words and what also might be helpful, so I started putting lots of stuff in. Plus I’ve added some terms just for fun.

Here’s a sample look at the dictionary, where I’ve done a search for OpenAPS, which is highlighted in green and has the all related terms underneath. On the left is the latest 5 terms added to the dictionary, plus a random term for you to learn about.
t1resources dictionary

You can find the dictionary under , Start Here, Diabetes & Tech Dictionary, or just go via its quick link http://bit.ly/t1rdictionary.

If there are any terms not listed click the ‘Want us to add a new definition?’ link and say what you would like to find out about.
If there are any definitions wrong click the icon to the right of each explanation and let me know what to change.

A note about Open Source: I’d initially imagined this would be an open source project but with a lack of understanding about getting started with Open Source development with my personal development environment I just coded it up, in private. One day when I have a bit of time I’ll change that, but in the meantime if you want to get access to the data please contact me.

Thanks for Paul Niven and Dr Anna Dover for the help and inspiration with this project.

Fun with Alexa/Nightscout/AndroidAPS – plus VERY important questions

After buying my eldest daughter an Amazon Echo for Christmas we decided to get one for the kitchen, then I remembered that it was possible to integrate Nightscout into it.

Within 30 minutes of starting from scratch I had it all set up, it was good, it worked well. Being a programmer though meant I couldn’t stop there so I delved into the unknown world of Echo development and added a couple of questions, just for fun, for Amy (video: 20 seconds in). After showing some of my Diabetes Dad friends I added a third question (video: 40 seconds in) which is an in-joke between us all.